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UNLV Police Lt. Richard Dohme, left, explains the function of weapons to
students Sept. 25 during the 11th
Annual Police Awareness Day(Photo/Evalesha Chidester)
UNLV Police Lt. Richard Dohme, left, explains the function of weapons to students Sept. 25 during the 11th Annual Police Awareness Day(Photo/Evalesha Chidester)

UNLV Campus Police Show Force and Friendship Outside Student Union

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The sight of such a large gathering of UNLV police vehicles, officers and weapons outside the Student Union might have caused concern on any other day.

However, on Sept. 25 when UNLV Police Services were out in full force, it was behind booths for the 11th Annual Police Awareness Day, and the purpose was to inform students of the services campus police provide and to get to know students.

The event helped promote Chief José Elique’s vision of community policing, a form of policing where officers become well-acquainted with the people in areas they monitor.

“We all know that 90 percent of the time when you’re interacting with police, it’s not positive,” Sgt. Paul Velez said. “This is a way for students to interact with us on a positive level.”

Among the bike officers, squadron cars and police vans, noticeably missing from the fair were the police horses and K-9 unit. It may be awhile before students see any horses walking around campus. The horse program is on a temporary hiatus while the department evaluates the budget, according to Velez. As for the K-9 unit, their previous dog has since retired but they are
working on getting two more.

The two dogs are not the only new things students will be seeing around campus from the police services. Some programs are being put into place as well.

“Sometimes our services are underutilized,” Velez said. “Right now we are pushing for students to register their bicycles and laptops with us.”

The laptop and bicycle registration is free to students and it is easy to sign up for.

“The whole point of registering bikes and laptops is because they are the two most commonly stolen items on campus,” Officer Laura Silva said.

When students go to register their items, they are asked to fill out a small form.

Information needed for the form includes:
-Registered owner
-Value of the item
-Address of the owner
-Residential Hall
-Cell phone number
-Make, model, color
-Any identifying features of the item

“We have a hard time identifying and recovering items,” Silva said, “but with the registration it is easier to identify items and so it is easier to prosecute and recover.”

Students can register their items at the police headquarters behind the old Carl’s Jr.on Maryland Parkway.

Representatives from the Jean Nidetch Women’s Center and from the Office of Student Conduct also had booths set up at the event.

Andrea Barefield represented the Office of Student Conduct, where she handed out pamphlets explaining university rules.

“It’s always important to know the rules of the university,” Barefield said. “Our most common violations are alcohol and academic misconduct.”

Follow Eva Chidester on Twitter @SeeEvaWrite for any questions or comments.

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